The 4 Ps: A Week of Firsts

Week 5 of 16 was about building strength – through some alpine hill-training, and my longest run so far. Here are the highlights as recorded by my Nike Plus app:

Paris Marathon Training Week 5

But the real highlights of my week were a couple of firsts… I participated in my first Parkrun, AND I had my screen debut at BAFTA in a short film made for the launch of Bupa’s new Health and Wellbeing app – Bupa Boost.

First things first. My first ever Parkrun. This was at Old Deer Park in Richmond. I was pretty nervous ahead of this, not really knowing what to expect. But, largely this was down to it being timed, which instantly gives me a surge of adrenalin and nerves. But there was no need to be nervous. Of course, as everyone says, these events are organised by a wonderful bunch of volunteers or “voluncheers”, who selflessly give up their Saturday mornings to encourage and facilitate these great 5k races. They are an excellent way to improve speed, if like me, that’s what you’re looking to do, or indeed just to motivate you to run. It is a wonderfully inclusive event, that caters for all running abilities. I’m hooked and will be trying out a few different Parkruns in the Richmond area over the coming weeks, not least to try and beat my time ;-)

BAFTA

And now for my second first of the week… my screen debut at the home of BAFTA, 195 Piccadilly. This is a very exclusive venue, limited to BAFTA members only, or corporates who use it for special events… In this case, it was for the latter, and a special event for Bupa’s new Boost app – a fun way to stay fit and healthy. The app cleverly enables you to pull in all your data from wearables and health tracking apps so you can aggregate the data in one place. It encourages you to set personal goals, and track your progress – against yourself and against your friends/family. So, when I was asked to feature in the film, I of course jumped at the opportunity!

You can watch the film here. My starring role kicks in at about 45 seconds…

And because there’s been lots of other stuff going on this week, here are some other photos from the week.

Monday’s hill training in Switzerland:

Hill training in the alps

On Tuesday I swapped the Brooks for Salomons, and a different kind of run:

Swapping the running shoes for skis

And here’s a selfie from the end of my 16-miler on Sunday with fellow BeaRCat runners Moni and Ali, training for London and Paris Marathons, respectively:

BearCat Runners

Happy running!

x

The 4 Ps: Building a Base

Week 4 of 16 was all about building a base… Appropriate as I write this overlooking a snowy Bruson, opposite Verbier in Switzerland, where the snow base is still building after an unseasonably mild winter so far.

Bruson

I arrived last night for a few days to celebrate 10 years of Bramble Ski – my brother’s ski business.

Before I set off, I completed my final run of the week – a very cold 14-miler along the Thames – taking my week’s mileage to 32, and 74 miles for the month so far.

Week 4 of Paris Marathon training

Not only did I complete my longest run since October 2014, but I also concentrated on speed again on Tuesday, with another tempo session similar to last week’s.

Interval speed sessions are important when you’re looking to improve pace, but the other effective way to do this is to incorporate some good hill workouts… And what better place to plan some hill training than in the Alps! The last time I was here in July, I took part in the Liddes-Verbier trail run, an 18-miler with an ascent of over 2,500m… I won’t be completing anything quite as challenging this week but tomorrow’s run will concentrate on hill reps, and in so doing I hope to build power and strength into my legs, and in turn speed.

Happy running!

x

The 4 Ps: No Pain, No Gain

3 down, 13 to go!

According to my Nike Plus Coach Programme, last week was about “Laying the Groundwork” for the remainder of my Paris Marathon training by increasing distance and taking on the longest run of my training so far.

Paris Marathon Training Week 3

The highlights of my week’s running was my tempo run with the BeaRCat Runners on Wednesday… and my long run on Saturday. Both were tough. But both were great for that very reason. Unless I feel as though I’ve gone through some kind of pain barrier, I don’t feel I’m making progress with my running – supporting that “no pain, no gain” theory!

The tempo run involved 5 x 300m at 85% effort (or Park Run pace) along the river between Richmond Bridge and the rowing boathouses, parallel with Petersham Road and past Gaucho and The Bingham, with recovery runs in between. These kind of runs can’t be done as successfully alone – so thank you to the BeaRCats for pushing me through it.

Richmond Bridge

My long run of 12 miles took in the 7.5 miles perimeter of Richmond Park with a few miles either side to get there and back. The weather on Saturday morning was not ideal with blustery winds and torrential rain at the half-way point, but again, that adds to the feeling of satisfaction when you get home and jump in the bath (hot one for me… I haven’t quite reached ice bath status).

Running with the deer in Richmond Park

Richmond Park is always a beautiful place to run around with lots of wonderful views and wildlife to take in – and none more so than last Saturday – when a herd of deer decided to make a mad dash for it across my path. It was a magical moment, which I was happy to capture on camera.

My 200th run completed

The other highlight of my week was hitting my 200th run in a year – and with it completing a total of 1336 miles – I wonder if I can beat that this year?!

Happy running!

x

The 4 Ps: New Year, New Shoes!

Week 2 of 16 complete! Week 2’s Paris Marathon training was focused on the “Fundamentals”, following the “Warm Up” week before.

Although I only ticked off 11 of my requisite 29 running miles last week (during Sunday’s long run), I covered many more than that on skis during an amazing ski break to the stunning resort of Söll in Austria.

Soll Austria Skiing

Given Week 2 involved more ski runs than running, my focus for last week’s review is going to be on another fundamental of running – that of running shoes!

To welcome in the New Year, I headed to my local running shop – Sporting Feet in Richmond – to be fitted for a new pair of trainers (depending on your running style, trainers should be replaced every 300-500 miles). I was looked after by Miles (appropriately named ;-)) who provided me with a very interesting fitting experience.

Sporting Feet Richmond Fitting Service

The experience started with a foot scan using Aetrex’s iStep technology. This advanced system uses state-of-the-art digital scanners and multiple pressure sensors, to accurately measure foot size and width, and determine arch type and pressure points quickly and effectively.

The scan takes a mere 30 seconds before revealing your arch type. In my case – I have a medium arch type. Apparently this is the ideal shape for running as the arch is more likely to be flexible and help absorb impact.

A medium arch tends to indicate a “Neutral” running style – with 20% of people fitting into this category. A neutral runner is thought to be more bio-mechanically efficient and balanced, with the foot pronating normally to absorb impact, and the heel and ankle staying in a mainly vertical position during running.

However, my scan suggested that I may slightly over-pronate on my right foot, with my left foot being neutral. Around 70% of people are said to over-pronate, which results in the foot and ankle rolling in excessively, thereby increasing the risk of injuries.

Squat Test Trainer Fitting

The second stage of the fitting experience involved two squat tests – which are designed to confirm visually the information gleaned from the digital foot scan. Miles, asked me to stand with my legs shoulder-width apart and my feet facing straight forwards. I then sat down into a squat position. Miles was looking to see if my knees were pointing inwards or directly forward. As suspected, my right knee pointed slightly inwards, confirming the over-pronation in my right foot, while my left knee pointed straight forwards.

The second test consisted of a single squat test. Again, standing with my legs shoulder-width apart and my feet facing straight forwards, Miles asked me to squat down on my right leg only, followed by left leg. As before, he was looking to see if my knees were pointing forwards or inwards. My right knee continued to point slightly inwards.

Based on the three tests, Miles recommended I go for a light supported shoe to help limit the over-pronation in my right foot.

Brooks Ravenna 6 Trainers

The next stage was the exciting one – deciding which trainers to go for! I’ve always been a bit of a Brooks fan and they are good for people with wider feet (like me!). I opted for the new Ravenna 6 style which has just been released… my new running shoes for the New Year!

So, go on… start this 2015 on the right foot, and go and get fitted for some new trainers :-)

Happy Running!

x

The 4 Ps: #15WeeksToGo

Week 1 of 16 done! Week 1 of 16 Summary This week was considered a “Warm-Up” week, aimed at getting me back into the swing of training six times a week after some time off post Norwich Half Marathon in November.

It was a tough week all-in-all – I felt quite stiff and achy at the beginning – and it’s been hard work juggling the runs with all the festivities. The week’s training included a mixture of running, cross-training (Bikram-Method Yoga) and rest, as follows: Paris Training Week 1 of 16 I was staying at my brother’s down in Rowland’s Castle for Christmas, and it was a welcome change to run some new routes – they just happened to be my fastest of the week too :-) Summary of Week 1 runs Here are a couple of photos from this week’s runs – the first on Christmas Day as it was such a beautiful day and the second was taken on Saturday’s long run (my last long run of 2014), which ended under a stunning sunset! Christmas Day run Rowlands Castle Twickenham Run

Week 2 of my training is going to suffer somewhat, as I’m heading to the Austrian Alps for some skiing over New Year… will report back next Sunday!
Happy Running and Happy New Year (in advance!)
x

The 4 Ps: Paris PB Project Plan

If you’re familiar with marketing, you’ll recognise the 4 Ps as the Marketing Mix of product, price, place and promotion.

Just as a marketer would plan the perfect launch of a shiny new product, I’ve applied this thinking to my campaign to successfully realise a Personal Best (PB) at the Paris Marathon on Sunday 12 April 2015.

Paris Marathon

  • Product – in this case, I’m trying to develop/realise the perfectly formed PB. How do I turn my running into a sub 4 hour reality?
  • Price – how much is this going to cost me, both physically and mentally (not to mention financially), and how do I find the optimum combination of the two so I don’t burn out too early, by getting injured or all-consumed, to the detriment of day-to-day life?
  • Place – on the big day the PB will be attempted/realised in Paris, but the training will take place around London over the next 16 weeks, with a few ski resorts thrown in too!
  • Promotion – and we all know that you’re more likely to achieve a goal if you visualise it, and commit it to writing – better still publicly – through a plan, which is where this blog comes in…

I’ve been reading many different programmes, taking advice from some seasoned runners and fellow BeaRCats, as well as reflecting on my own previous experiences of running the London Marathon twice… And the overriding consensus is that there’s no one-size fits all plan. As Dominic from Sporting Feet, Richmond said “It’s about intelligent running” and Caitlin, founder of The BeaRCat Running Club added “Think quality if you are looking for a time…

We all lead busy lives, and therefore need to be flexible in our approach to training for a big challenge such as this, otherwise we are only setting ourselves up for failure. It does however need to start with a plan, and yes expect to deviate from the plan, but you still need to have a starting point from which to focus and somewhere to return to, when you do go off-piste.

My programme begins tomorrow – Christmas week – a prime example of having to juggle busy lives with running…

My plan is a combination of a Hal Higdon programme, Nike Plus coach, and various other contributors, including Caitlin of the BeaRCats. If you’re interested in reading it, you can view it here: Paris Training Programme.

You can also follow my progress to Paris right here with my weekly review, tips and tricks. And of course, if you’ve got any words of wisdom, I’d love to hear from you.

Happy Christmas and happy running!

x

2014 – A Year of Two Halves?

Well actually three half… marathons, a 30km trail run, a 10-miler and a 10k.

FullSizeRender

I can’t quite believe it but tomorrow is December. 2015 is suddenly around the corner. Festive lights and decorations adorn the streets. We wore Christmas jumpers to work last week. And all the talk is of Christmas parties and holidays. So as is tradition at this time of year, it is only right to review the year, and what I’ve learned ahead of another year, and another year of challenges…

In January I set myself a number of running goals and last weekend, I ticked off two of them. I achieved a PB in the Norwich Half Marathon (taking a whole 2 seconds off my previous PB set at Richmond in March!) and at the same time I completed my sixth and final running challenge of the year.

Norwich Half time

The conditions last weekend were pretty nasty. Even Steve Gill (who we met taking part in his 31st of 52 half marathons in as many weeks, on behalf of the RNLI) said it was the wettest he had run all year! And my pre-race preparations hadn’t gone to plan… I had a cough and a cold in the few days running up to the event, so was feeling decidedly nervous. Especially having followed a 12 week training programme in an attempt to try to slip under the 1:50 mark. But, as I was to learn, training programmes don’t always go to plan.

IMG_4220

So while I was pounding through the puddles in Norfolk last Sunday, I began to think about my greatest take-outs and learnings from my running this year. And, I think I can summarise them as follows:

  1. Set a plan, and then plan for the plan not to go to plan… Caitlin (founder of the BeaRCats) said this in a marathon motivational talk a couple of Sundays ago. Whatever plan you set, you can be sure something will crop up to disrupt it, whether it’s a holiday, a cough, or an injury.
  2. Listen to your body. If you are ill or injured, take it easy. It can be the most frustrating thing to sit still and not to don those running shoes, but in the long run, it will pay off.
  3. Run your own race. When training or discussing target race times, try not to compare yourself to others. Running is so relative, and we all have our different strengths and weaknesses.
  4. Know your strengths and weaknesses. And plan your training accordingly. I know my weakness is speed, so I need to mix up my training a bit more – by doing more hills, speed training, and strength training.
  5. And most of all, have fun and don’t put too much pressure on yourself! 

10360544_10154747441105599_3370587225970453033_n

While I reflect on a year of great running, I think of all the new memories (and medals!) I have. Running is about staying fit (and sane), but it’s also about community, and my running year would not have been the same had it not been for my running buddies – Nicky and Sion, and the BeaRCat Running Club.

68138_719256278155942_3509845152126904295_n

It has been such a source of support knowing that I’m surrounded by a group of like-minded people who are all as passionate about running as me… and as I enter 2015, and embark on the next challenge, in the form of the Paris Marathon, I do so in the knowledge that I have a great support network of running friends. And this makes me very excited about next year and the adventures to come.

Happy Running, Happy Christmas and all the best for 2015!

G x

Trails and Tribulations

On Saturday I took part in the Liddes-Verbier 29km trail run in the Swiss Alps, the baby race of the Trail Verbier St-Bernard family.

Trail Verbier St Bernard

In the lead up to the run, I’ve been following a 14 week training programme of around 500 miles, and definitely not enough hills! It was my friend Tori that first introduced me to trail running – when in 2012 and 2013 we took part in the Eco Trail de Paris and the Beaujolais Villages Trail together. With their combined ascents of 1,250m, this 29km at 1,498m altitude, with a climb of 2,500m+ was always going to be tougher…

Liddes to VerbierThe run consists of two big ascents, the first of which is higher than Snowdon (1,085m) and the second higher than Ben Nevis (1,344m)! And with fog and rain welcoming us at about 2,000m on both climbs it sadly meant we missed out on enjoying the stunning scenery of the St Bernard region.

The view

The descents were pretty treacherous also – technical terrain made very muddy and slippy by a number of days of persistent rain. Given all of this, I was pretty pleased to arrive in Verbier in 6 hours 31 mins, in 127th place (27th in my category) and pick up my finisher’s t-shirt!

Sarah Mayo in Verbier

Throughout, I had a lot of time to think. When not trying to work out how long until the next check point or where to plant my next pole, I began thinking that trail running is a great metaphor for life. There are ups and downs, there are twists and turns, slips and tumbles, blood, sweat and tears, but there is always one constant… the people around you, the people that help you through the tough times as well as the good times.

It’s these people that helped me complete this challenge, and my heartfelt gratitude goes out to them all:

  1. My support crew of sister-in-law Miki and nieces Sana and Fumi – from the start at Liddes, to the half-way point at Lourtier, to the end in Verbier – it was such a welcoming sight to see their smiling faces supporting me come rain or shine! (And sorry Sana for “STILL talking about that silly run”!) My running support crew
  2. Organisers, supporters and fellow runners - races like this take so much organisation, especially in inclement weather as it was this past weekend. My thanks to all those supporters/volunteers who were out in force along the route shouting “Bravo” or “You crazy trail runners!” and my fellow runners who picked me up with words such as “Courage” when I paused to rest or literally picked me up when I slipped and fell… Start of Liddes
  3. The BeaRCat Running Club – I was proud to wear my BeaRCat running vest, promoting this great running club around the Swiss Alps! I’ve been a member since the end of last year, and this fab community has provided so much friendly support and sage advice over this short space of time. Sarah Mayo Bearcat Runner
  4. Family and friends – A huge thanks to all my family and friends who have patiently been there for me over the last few months throughout all my training. For all your encouragement and lovely words of support, I’m forever grateful. Colin of the Collines
  5. And finally, my brother Colin – as I said earlier, my event was only the baby distance and it is with awe that I write about my brother who completed the daddy of the races – a gruelling 105km route, over a 7,500m ascent, in an incredible time of 22 hours 38 minutes, finishing in a staggering 46th place (12th in his category). I thought of him a great deal throughout my race, having started 8 hours before me, and knowing that he would finish around 8 hours after me (at 3.30am). When the climbs were tough, the thought of Colin somewhere nearby in the mountains kept on driving me forward. What an achievement Col, I’m massively proud of you. (It’s also just occurred to me that ‘colline’ in French means ‘hill’ – very apt that he should be so at home in the hills!!)

My closing thought may seem clichéd but I can’t argue with it… We all run our own races in life… We can’t compare our chapter 37 to someone else’s chapter 40… So, whatever your goal or race be proud of what you achieve, and don’t forget it’s the people around you that are important. They are the greatest prize of all. And so it’s to them and you, that I wholeheartedly thank and dedicate this post.

Santé!

G x

A tale of three cities…

Over the last few weeks, there’s been a lot of talk about marathons… Running bore alert!

It all started a couple of Sundays ago, when I went to watch the London Marathon with fellow BeaRCat runners. London was looking resplendent in the sunshine and the iconic landmarks of Big Ben and the Embankment provided a stunning backdrop to this incredible event. It was such an inspirational day and brought back memories of my two London Marathons in 2000 and 2010. The experience planted a seed and got me thinking about my 2015 running challenges…

London marathon

On the day after I had a whirlwind business trip to Paris. This is one of my favourite cities having spent 6 months working here when I was 18. In April 2012 I also took part in the Eco Trail de Paris, a 30km race around the trails of the Paris suburbs, ending up at the foot of the Eiffel Tower. All the memories came flooding back as we enjoyed a tour of the Seine, and the Champs Elysees on the back of a moto taxi! The sun was shining and the city was looking spectacular. So, it was perhaps not surprising that when I got back, and with the 2015 Paris Marathon ballot open for entries, I decided to try my luck by entering…

Eiffel Tower

And then last weekend, I enjoyed three glorious days in Edinburgh, the city where I grew up. The sun was once again shining and the city was looking stunning. I went on my favourite run up Arthur’s Seat, a bit of a tradition whenever I’m up and enjoyed the reward of the breathtaking views overlooking Edinburgh and the Firth of Forth. I was chatting to my parents about marathons and was reminded that they were the ones that inspired my interest in running when they both took part in the Edinburgh Marathon during their 40th birthday years, achieving amazing times of 3.26 and 4.08, respectively. This got me thinking, why have I never considered running Edinburgh, my home race? So I decided that should I not get through the Paris ballot, I’d sign up to the 2015 Edinburgh Marathon instead!

Edinburgh Castle from Arthur's Seat

I was of course tempted to enter the ballot for London when it opened this Tuesday but decided that I’d leave that re-run until 2020, making it a 10-yearly thing! Anyway, my 2015 running goals were decided for me this Wednesday, when I received a congratulations email to say that I have been accepted into the Paris Marathon on the 12 April 2015.

Et bah dis donc, I guess that’s my 2015 running challenge sorted then. Edinburgh will have to wait until another year. The countdown is on. 341 days to go!

A bientot!

G x

Back to Basics with Bikram

While I’ve been following a strict running programme since January, my Bikram Yoga practice has suffered. On Monday night, after 10 weeks off, I finally plucked up the courage to head back to Bikram…

Keep calm and Bikram on

It was gruelling. I had forgotten how much of a heart-pumping, limb-stretching, sweat-inducing workout it is! To try and combat the inevitable stiffening up, I headed back for more on Tuesday night… and even so, come Wednesday and still today, the back of my legs and glutes are feeling it.

I can’t believe how out of Bikram shape I feel! It’s clear that I have a lot of work to do, to undo all of the tension that my rigorous running regime has built up within my body and regain the flexibility I had at the beginning of the year…

So, to remind myself why I put myself through it, I thought I’d revisit some of the basics of Bikram, and why it is of benefit for runners, and others alike.

bikram logo

Here’s my ABC of the benefits of Bikram Yoga:

  1. A is for: Agility and Alignment – This practice is the perfect antidote to running, helping with loosening up those tight hamstrings and improving general stretching. The postures and stretches elongate the limbs (the opposite effect to running) and encourages you to stand taller, stronger and prouder.
  2. B is for: Breathing and Balance – Regular practice of Bikram is proven to increase lung capacity, which is obviously great for runners. The focus on breathing within the class also enables you to move more easily into a meditative state, with the mind and body working in harmony – a great skill to adopt during long-distance running especially.
  3. C is for: Core strength and Concentration – Lots of runners choose to practice Bikram to build core strength and stamina. It’s a great overall exercise for the whole body (and mind). The series of 26 postures works through the entire body, and helps focus on core strength by encouraging you to keep your tummy tucked in throughout (ostensibly to protect the spine).
  4. D is for: Discipline and Determination – Bikram commands an amazing amount of focus and discipline in order to get the full benefits of each posture. As you enter that meditative state, the mind is emptied of all thoughts, giving you the mental strength to keep going longer. Again, another great tool for long-distance runners.
  5. E is for: Energy and Everyday wellbeing – Regular Bikram practice is detoxifying and energising. The benefits are far more than about fitness, with evidence that it supports digestive, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, lymphatic, nervous, immune and skeletal muscular systems.

So, I guess the main ABC lesson of this blog is to find that happy balance between running and Bikram practice and you can only reap the rewards!

G x

 

 

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